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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Unless I am mistaken this new GM platform / chassis is among the first (if not the first) to offer a customer option to have your new SS or RS Blazer configured as a FWD, RWD or AWD vehicle. I was wondering in terms of just basic efficiency (Miles vs kWH's consumed) which option would come out on top. I would think that the AWD would place third, but which, FWD or RWD would be best and why? Are there any inherent properties of a FWD configuration or a RWD configuration that would enable one over the other to be more efficient? Maybe this is a rhetorical question, but it might be fun to kick around.
 

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Unless I am mistaken this new GM platform / chassis is among the first (if not the first) to offer a customer option to have your new SS or RS Blazer configured as a FWD, RWD or AWD vehicle. I was wondering in terms of just basic efficiency (Miles vs kWH's consumed) which option would come out on top. I would think that the AWD would place third, but which, FWD or RWD would be best and why? Are there any inherent properties of a FWD configuration or a RWD configuration that would enable one over the other to be more efficient? Maybe this is a rhetorical question, but it might be fun to kick around.
Well, first off, everything I say here could be wrong and is my opinion or just a WAG. I don't think the SS trim comes with any drive other than AWD. I further think that the RS is the only trim that you can get FWD, RWD or AWD which I believe is a first in the auto industry. And, I think the LTs will come with FWD, or maybe, RWD only.

So, which drive configuration yields the highest estimated range of 320 miles for the RS trim? I presume it would be either FWD or RWD; but, I'm thinking the FWD (small motor) would yield the max mileage (320) over the better handling RWD (large motor). Unfortunately, the AWD (probably with a small front and large rear motor) version of the RS will most likely be the worst setup in terms of range. But, performance wise, the AWD would be first, RWD second and FWD third.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It looks like I am wrong about the available powertrains on the SS and it is the RS that gives customers the option to select how it is configured.
" The entry-level RS still comes with front-wheel drive from the low-power motor, but it gets the medium-size battery, and it costs $51,995. However, you can select a large (bigger than the medium-size) battery pack model that comes standard with rear-wheel drive. The rear-drive RS gets a different, more powerful motor than the front-drive Blazer EV does. Additionally, you can spec the RS trim with the dual-motor all-wheel-drive setup that is optional on the 2LT. Maximum range for the RS is 320 miles, making it the trim with the theoretical longest range. Unfortunately, we don’t yet have output figures for these various trims, but expect the Blazer EV to follow a similar pattern as other EVs. The all-wheel-drive dual-motor versions will have the most power and best acceleration, while the single-motor versions offer up the maximum amount of range with their respective battery packs. If you spec the “comfort and convenience” packages on the RS or 2LT, you unlock the 1,500-pound towing capacity that the Blazer EV offers, but it’s only available on these models."
 

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It looks like I am wrong about the available powertrains on the SS and it is the RS that gives customers the option to select how it is configured.
" The entry-level RS still comes with front-wheel drive from the low-power motor, but it gets the medium-size battery, and it costs $51,995. However, you can select a large (bigger than the medium-size) battery pack model that comes standard with rear-wheel drive. The rear-drive RS gets a different, more powerful motor than the front-drive Blazer EV does. Additionally, you can spec the RS trim with the dual-motor all-wheel-drive setup that is optional on the 2LT. Maximum range for the RS is 320 miles, making it the trim with the theoretical longest range. Unfortunately, we don’t yet have output figures for these various trims, but expect the Blazer EV to follow a similar pattern as other EVs. The all-wheel-drive dual-motor versions will have the most power and best acceleration, while the single-motor versions offer up the maximum amount of range with their respective battery packs. If you spec the “comfort and convenience” packages on the RS or 2LT, you unlock the 1,500-pound towing capacity that the Blazer EV offers, but it’s only available on these models."
Well, there you go. Guess I was sort of right on some of it. I was just to lazy to go back and look it up like you did! ;) I've owned lots of cars over my lifetime and I have never had such a hard time figuring out pertinent information, facts, and specifications on them as I have now that I've become interested in getting a BEV vehicle! ⚡o_O Anyway, suppose it gives me something to do in my spare time. :giggle:
 

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Well, first off, everything I say here could be wrong and is my opinion or just a WAG. I don't think the SS trim comes with any drive other than AWD. I further think that the RS is the only trim that you can get FWD, RWD or AWD which I believe is a first in the auto industry. And, I think the LTs will come with FWD, or maybe, RWD only.

So, which drive configuration yields the highest estimated range of 320 miles for the RS trim? I presume it would be either FWD or RWD; but, I'm thinking the FWD (small motor) would yield the max mileage (320) over the better handling RWD (large motor). Unfortunately, the AWD (probably with a small front and large rear motor) version of the RS will most likely be the worst setup in terms of range. But, performance wise, the AWD would be first, RWD second and FWD third.
On the Blazer's trim section, it states the RS RWD would have the 320 mile range. Not sure if that is because of a smaller motor or not. I saw in a article that stated how GM have three motors, small front motors and small and big rear motors. They mentioned the LT and RS models were small front motor and two smalls for AWD. I want to say they said the RS RWD had a large motor in the rear The SS was small front and bigger powerful rear(probably tweaked RS RWD motor) for AWD.
 

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I don't believe it's confirmed which motor is in the rear of the RS Blazer. I re-read multiple times and didn't see it mentioned.

The Lyriq has a large rear motor and it makes 500hp, not 557. Presumably because of the SS Wow mode
 

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Great video. I mistyped and meant I wasn't sure which motor was in the rear of the AWD RS Blazer. I'm 95% sure now it's the small unit in the front and rear of the AWD and only the big unit in the rear on the RWD but he makes it seem like the SS gets a second front motor.

I need a chart and specs. Lol.

Is it
LT -
small front
2LT
small front
Small front and small rear
RS
small front
large rear
Small front and large Rear
SS
Two front (small) and large rear

It can't be. I'm over analyzing.
 

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I agree, it's hard to follow even with the chief engineer laying out the configurations! He talks about small, medium and large battery packs and throws in some small and big motors in the mix too. The guy doing the interview seems to interrupt the engineer at times which disrupts his train of thought and complicates his explanation in my opinion. Hopefully we will get some more details (a chart would be nice) on these specific configurations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So I guess all we can do is theorize as to my initial question concerning best driveline efficiency given the various batteries that might be available. So, this becomes the question; Is there an inherent efficiency advantage in a FWD configuration over a RWD configuration or vise versa and why?
 

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So I guess all we can do is theorize as to my initial question concerning best driveline efficiency given the various batteries that might be available. So, this becomes the question; Is there an inherent efficiency advantage in a FWD configuration over a RWD configuration or vise versa and why?
The one thing that we do know for certain, as confirmed by the chief engineer in the video above, is that the most efficient configuration is the RWD RS with the greatest Blazer EV range of 320 miles, and, with a "larger drive unit." A "larger drive unit" is, I assume, is a larger motor and/or battery pack?
 

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So I guess all we can do is theorize as to my initial question concerning best driveline efficiency given the various batteries that might be available. So, this becomes the question; Is there an inherent efficiency advantage in a FWD configuration over a RWD configuration or vise versa and why?
That's really a mixed bag. I'm assuming you're asking best efficiency as in best miles per kWh. Efficiency can be had by different ways plus we don't have enough data to know at this point. A smaller battery pack with small motor is less weight so that could cause better efficiency. A large battery with a powerful motor would be heavier but the powerful motor could make up for the weight. Mostly likely the former based on other EV's real world data. With Fwd vs RWD. I've heard from people that live in wintery areas prefer FWD if AWD isn't available as FWD gives them better control. I'm not familiar with this as I'm in the southern states and winters are like 3 days out of the year 😂.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That's really a mixed bag. I'm assuming you're asking best efficiency as in best miles per kWh. Efficiency can be had by different ways plus we don't have enough data to know at this point. A smaller battery pack with small motor is less weight so that could cause better efficiency. A large battery with a powerful motor would be heavier but the powerful motor could make up for the weight. Mostly likely the former based on other EV's real world data. With Fwd vs RWD. I've heard from people that live in wintery areas prefer FWD if AWD isn't available as FWD gives them better control. I'm not familiar with this as I'm in the southern states and winters are like 3 days out of the year 😂.
It's really a question /curiosity that might be based on theory only? Is there an inherent efficiency advantage in a FWD configuration over a RWD configuration or vise versa. Just consider that the battery size / power is the same for both.
 

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It's really a question /curiosity that might be based on theory only? Is there an inherent efficiency advantage in a FWD configuration over a RWD configuration or vise versa. Just consider that the battery size / power is the same for both.
In ICE vehicles, typically FWD because the weight of the drivetrain is less than that of a RWD. If battery & motor are equal no matter the positioning, in my opinion, it would be little difference in efficiency outside of driving conditions.
 

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Since the RS which I reserved came in all three configurations I had the same question about which was best. I found a great article at Motortrend that explained the impact. AWD, FWD, or RWD—Which Is Best, and Which Should You Buy? Since the RWD RS is claiming to have the longest range, I'm expecting that it provides greater room for battery and more efficient motor. My one thought for the article I listed is that the weight distribution on these new EVs are significantly different with the front-end not being the largest share of weight so how does that affect FWD traction?
 

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Since the RS which I reserved came in all three configurations I had the same question about which was best. I found a great article at Motortrend that explained the impact. AWD, FWD, or RWD—Which Is Best, and Which Should You Buy? Since the RWD RS is claiming to have the longest range, I'm expecting that it provides greater room for battery and more efficient motor. My one thought for the article I listed is that the weight distribution on these new EVs are significantly different with the front-end not being the largest share of weight so how does that affect FWD traction?
Thanks Mark for posting the MotorTrend article comparing auto drive systems. As expected, the article mainly deals with ICE vehicles. It seems to me that EVs should be evaluated differently due to the way they are designed with the motor position dictating the drive position. Therefore, in my uneducated way of looking at this situation, I wouldn't think there would be much difference or advantage between FWD and RWD in terms of superior traction. However, I would think that generally a RWD car would handle better than a FWD car because the RWD frees up the front tires for superior steering characteristics because of no stress force of a motors interference in the steering process. Then, of course, the AWD system IMO would be the best of both worlds for both traction and handling under all conditions and circumstances. Unfortunately though, AWD adds weight, cost and complexity while also reducing the range of the vehicle. However, conversely, the AWD gives you enhanced performance along with the improved handling and traction. So, to me anyway, it boils down to a trade-off between cost and performance.

Since it seems that the Blazer EV is going to be somewhat (maybe a whole lot) like the Lyriq, in terms of platform and drive systems, I thought it might make sense to take a closer look at it in order to get a better understanding of what we might see in the Blazer EV. I'm trying to decide whether I want to order a RWD or AWD drive system on my RS when the time comes. And, this exercise has probably helped me makeup my mind that I'll be going with the AWD versus the RWD Blazer RS...assuming the difference in cost for the AWD is not crazy high! o_O

So, here's what I found out. The RWD Lyriq has 340 hp. and a 0-60 time of 6.1 seconds! That 6.1 seconds will not cut it for me! One of the underlying reasons for wanting a BEV in the first place is the performance and instant torque that they can produce. I may be old...but I'm not dead! I'm looking for something that will give me a good adrenalin rush and feed my need for speed! ⚡:D I just gave up motorcycles after riding for 65 years and I'm looking for something to replace the thrill of motorcycling while also providing the utility of a nice driving vehicle. The Lyriq AWD is supposed to have 500 hp. but I can't find anything that says what the 0-60 time is for it. But, I'll bet it's a whole lot better than 6.1 seconds! Hopefully the Blazer AWD will come in with hp. #'s up in that range too. Cadillac is only charging a premium of $2k to upgrade from RWD to AWD on the Lyriq. Here's hoping that the Blazer will be a similar amount! I'd be interested to know if anyone else has any additional insight on this subject?
 

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That made me chuckle. My little Bolt EV with "Sport" turned on is supposed to do 0-60 in guess what?........... 6.1 seconds. That's a Caddie that must be meant for smoothness not performance.
 

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Since the RS which I reserved came in all three configurations I had the same question about which was best. I found a great article at Motortrend that explained the impact. AWD, FWD, or RWD—Which Is Best, and Which Should You Buy? Since the RWD RS is claiming to have the longest range, I'm expecting that it provides greater room for battery and more efficient motor. My one thought for the article I listed is that the weight distribution on these new EVs are significantly different with the front-end not being the largest share of weight so how does that affect FWD traction?
Look at this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDzqo5MU62A&t=206s

From what Doug saying:
ModelConfigurationBattery PackRange (miles)
1LTFWDSmall247
2LT & RSFWDMedium293 (estimated for RS FWD, should be similar to 2LT FWD)
2LT & RSAWDMediumUnknown
RSRWDLarge320
SSAWDLarge290

Also, I saw some informations about drives but they are not confirmed. From this source SS HP is lower than announced BUT, 557HP is maybe only for WOW mode
Torque for FWD doesn't make sense (in N-m)

ModelConfigurationHPTorque
1LTFWD248 hp (185 kW)255 lb-ft (305 N-m)
2LT & RSFWD212 hp (158 kW)225 lb-ft (305 N-m)
2LT & RSAWD295 hp (220 kW)346 lb-ft (469 N-m)
RSRWD342 hp (255 kW)300 lb-ft (407 N-m)
SSAWD500 hp (373 kW)525 lb-ft (712 N-m)
 

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I understand that your hp/torque figures are "not confirmed." I don't buy the 2LT and RS AWD @ 295 hp. I've never seen an AWD (two motors) with less hp and torque than a two-wheel (one motor) variant. And, the SS trims is rated...I think from my [email protected] 557 hp (in WOW mode) and around 650 lb-ft of torque.

Appreciate you input though! (y)
 
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